Chronic Inflammatory Disorders Associated with Higher Risk for Cardiovascular Events

Chronic Inflammatory Disorders Associated with Higher Risk for Cardiovascular Events
Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic events, such as stroke and diabetes, particularly for patients on corticosteroids or NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), a new study shows. The study “Cardiovascular and type 2 diabetes morbidity and all-cause mortality among diverse chronic inflammatory disorders” was published in the journal Heart. There have been many studies documenting the role of inflammation in CVD (cardiovascular disease) and the related prognosis. Patients who have chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and psoriasis have been associated with a higher risk of many CVDs, including coronary heart disease (CHD) stroke, Type 2 diabetes, peripheral artery disease (PAD), venous thromboembolism (VTE) and CVD-related mortality. Alex Dregan, PhD, led a research group at King’s College London that expanded on this topic by showing in a previous study there was an increased risk of CVD events associated with a range of diverse chronic inflammatory disorders, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. However, at the time of that study, they could not take into account socio-economic disparities between patients, and this factor is a known cause associated with the prevalence of cardiometabolic disorders. In order to account for this variable, Dregan’s group conducted another study, this time in a richer socio-economi
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *