Depression May Influence Progression of Crohn’s Disease, Study Finds

Depression May Influence Progression of Crohn’s Disease, Study Finds
Depression is a psychological condition that is twice as prevalent in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) than in healthy people. Despite its high incidence, there is no clear evidence supporting the hypothesis that depression could promote IBD progression, according to a recent report. The review article, “Systematic Review and Meta-analysis: The impact of a depressive state on disease course in adult inflammatory bowel disease,” was published  in the journal Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. Researchers from Imperial College London and St George’s, University of London, found that depression is associated more with the progression of Crohn’s disease (CD) than in ulcerative colitis (UC). "This study is about investigating whether stress and depression make inflammatory conditions worse,” Dr. Sonia Saxena, author of the study, said in a news release from Imperial College London written by Ryan O'Hare. "We are still trying to untangle how depression and inflammatory bowel conditions could be linked," Saxena said. "If being depressed makes things much worse, it’s important we are able to diagnose that. Essentially, if we could make a patient’s gut inflammation better by treating their depression, we could potentially avoid these side effects and improve patients’ quality of life." Symptoms of IBD include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and extreme tiredness, all of which affect the patient’s overall quality of life. Due to the high incidence of psych
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