In Remission, But Preparing for the ‘What Ifs’ of Travel

In Remission, But Preparing for the ‘What Ifs’ of Travel
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crohn's corner
I’ve been off prednisone for a little less than a week. It’s weird to get up, have breakfast, and not reach for my daily pills. Things have been going pretty well so far. As I had been lowering my daily dosage, I had noticed a few symptoms coming back — the occasional pain or discomfort, but nothing I can’t handle. I’ve needed only percocet once or twice, and the pain hasn’t gone on for too long. But I’m still really nervous that Crohn’s will come back in all of it’s un-fun glory. It’s happened before.

I’ve been on low dosages of prednisone and have gotten very sick. I rarely get off of prednisone without getting sick, and needing to go back on a high dose of  it. But there have been other times I’ve gone a few weeks without being sick, only to start all over again. So you can understand why I’m nervous.

Tomorrow I’m going on a short, two-day trip to Florida to meet with some friends from around the country. We’ve been planning our reunion for months, and I’m really excited about it. I haven’t seen any of them in a long time and we’ve all been friends for 20 years.

But lurking behind my excitement is nervousness. What if a flare starts tomorrow as I’m leaving? What if it starts in the middle of Disney World, of all places? What if I get sick overnight with my friend in the room? What if I can’t participate in all of the fun? What if? What if? What if?

I’m doing what I can to avoid, or at least to manage, the “what ifs.” I’m bringing emergency prednisone with me to take at a moment’s notice if needed. I’m bringing emergency percocet for any pain. I’ve told my friends that I might not have the same energy as they have. Even though I  am technically in remission, I don’t have the normal energy of someone my age. I’m exhausted most of the time, and physical activity is a huge effort. So, I’m doing what I can to avoid a disaster. (I’ve gone on trips less prepared and I’ve always paid the price.)

I guess I’ll “see” all of you when I’m back next week with another column. Hopefully I’ll have only good things to report about my trip.

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Note: IBD News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of IBD News Today, or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to IBD.

Margarida graduated with a BS in Health Sciences from the University of Lisbon and a MSc in Biotechnology from Instituto Superior Técnico (IST-UL). She worked as a molecular biologist research associate at a Cambridge UK-based biotech company that discovers and develops therapeutic, fully human monoclonal antibodies.
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Margarida graduated with a BS in Health Sciences from the University of Lisbon and a MSc in Biotechnology from Instituto Superior Técnico (IST-UL). She worked as a molecular biologist research associate at a Cambridge UK-based biotech company that discovers and develops therapeutic, fully human monoclonal antibodies.
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