Why I Don’t Mind Sharing About My Invisible Illness

Why I Don’t Mind Sharing About My Invisible Illness
A friend of mine has a very sick son. He is eight years old, and he has a condition that ultimately will kill him at a young age. It keeps him in a wheelchair, and because he has trouble keeping his head up, he uses a special pillow to keep it straight. It's obvious to anyone who meets him that something serious is going on. When they're out and about trying to enjoy "regular family" things, like attend a movie or school event, his mom hates it. She hates it because it is inevitable someone (usually a child) asks, "Why is he in that wheelchair?" She usually answers with "Don't worry about it. Go find your parents." We've talked a lot about whether she should just tell the child who asks the name of his disease and tell him to go ask his parents about it, or whether it's okay to be firm about not wanting to talk about it. That boy's condition is visible. He and his family have no choice but to reveal it when they are out of the house. Crohn's disease is invisible. No one has to know I have it, yet I am fine with sharing it. In fact, I feel like I have to, because I'm constantly asked why I'm so thin. "How do you do it?" people ask. Or "You're so lucky" they will say. Am I supposed to remain silent, shrug my shoulders, and act flattered? I guess I could. But I really don't want to. I want people to learn that about Crohn's. Unlike my friend's view of illness, I want to educate people about the disease. Since only a million people in the U.S. have it, and because there are many digestive disorders, I feel like raising awareness is
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *