Neurological Symptoms of Gulf War Illness Linked to Intestinal Disturbances, Study Suggests

Neurological Symptoms of Gulf War Illness Linked to Intestinal Disturbances, Study Suggests

Gulf War Illness (GWI) has many symptoms, and now a link between changes in the gut microbiome (bacteria living in the intestines) and neuroinflammation (inflammation of the brain) has been identified, according to a new study. These findings may result in new treatment approaches for people with GWI gastrointestinal disturbances and symptoms of brain impairment.

The study, "Altered gut microbiome in a mouse model of Gulf War Illness causes neuroinflammation and intestinal injury via leaky gut and TLR4 activation," published in PLOS One, was conducted at the University of South Carolina Arnold School of Public Health. Gulf War Illness (also known as Gulf War Syndrome) affects 25 to 32 percent of the 700,000 U.S. veterans who served in the 1990-91 Persian Gulf War, and can be traced to chemical exposure. Symptoms of GWI include chronic headache; cognitive impairment such as memory and concentration difficulties; debilitating fatigue; widespread pain; respiratory, sleep, and gastrointestinal problems; and other unexplained medical symptoms. Previous studies have focused on the neurological effects of the disease; less is know about the mechanisms that link intestinal and neurological abnormalities. Researchers used a mouse model of GWI and found that the disease alters the stomach microbiome. The “bad” bacteria then produce toxic substan
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