Arizona State, Mayo Clinic Researchers Identify Potential New Biomarkers for Diagnosing Crohn’s

Arizona State, Mayo Clinic Researchers Identify Potential New Biomarkers for Diagnosing Crohn’s
Researchers have identified novel biomarkers for diagnosing Crohn’s disease in a collaborative study between Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute and the Mayo Clinic. They also built a novel blood test that distinguishes patients from healthy individuals. Their study, "Identification of antibody against SNRPB, small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated proteins B and B', as an autoantibody marker in Crohn's disease using an immunoproteomics approach," appeared in the Journal of Crohn's and Colitis. Crohn’s disease is caused by inflammation in the digestive tract, and diagnosing it can be quite expensive and invasive. So scientists were eager to discover valuable molecules, or biomarkers, found only in Crohn's patients and that could be detected with a simple blood test. “To truly alter the natural history of Crohn’s disease and help people, we needed to develop a new test for early, accurate diagnosis, as well as administrating appropriate therapy,” Josh LaBaer, interim executive director of the Biodesign Institute, said in a news release. “Increasing evidence suggests the Crohn’s disease immune response may be a result of altered microbes in the gut or exposure to harmful toxins that will result in antibodies against microbial and human proteins being made that are very specific manifestation of the disease,” said LaBaer's colleague, Ji Qiu. “Many blood-based biomarkers have been discovered, but currently commercially available blood tests have not been widely adapted into clinical practice because they fail to accurately diagnose Crohn’s disease.” To look for suitable biomarkers, researchers analyzed blood samples from 48 Crohn's patients and age- and gender-matched healthy individuals. Samples were taken from Bioba
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