Protein Variant Protects Against IBD, Colon Cancer in Mice, Study Shows

Protein Variant Protects Against IBD, Colon Cancer in Mice, Study Shows
A protein variant called IRAK-M is capable of protecting mice against inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and certain forms of colon cancer, researchers have found. This outcome eventually could be a viable therapeutic strategy for preventing inflammatory bowel disease and cancer in humans, according to the lead member of the research team. The study “Enhanced Mucosal Defense and Reduced Tumor Burden in Mice with the Compromised Negative Regulator IRAK-M” was published in the journal EBioMedicine. High, abnormal inflammation in the gut is the underlying cause for IBD. Moreover, a significant proportion of IBD patients have increased risk for developing colitis-associated cancer, a form of colon cancer preceded by clinically detectable IBD, either Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC). Our gut is colonized by a diverse range of bacteria populations, collectively known as the gut microbiome, increasingly recognized for its protective role. However, uncontrolled inflammation damages the protective cellular lining in the intestine, and also is associated with alterations to the bacteria pool, enhancing bacteria invasion of the mucosa. A team of researchers at Virginia Tech University focused on a single protein, called interleukin receptor associated kinase M (IRAK-M). The team found that IRAK-M expression is significantly increased (aka "up-regulated") in human patients with IBD and colitis-associated cancer. Moreover, the same pattern of up-regulation was detected in advanced stages of colorectal cancer. Previou
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