High Intake of Red Meat by Men Linked to Diverticulitis

High Intake of Red Meat by Men Linked to Diverticulitis
Eating large quantities of red meats, particularly those that are unprocessed, might be linked to an increased risk of diverticulitis, a common inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), reports a study published online recently. The study, “Meat intake and risk of diverticulitis among men,” was published in the journal Gut. It also suggests that replacing one daily portion of unprocessed red meat with poultry or fish may lower the risk of developing diverticulitis by 20%. Diverticulitis has been linked to smoking, taking anti-inflammatory drugs (particularly non-steroidal drugs), being physically inactive and obesity. But besides these links, not much is known about the causes of this condition. Diet is thought to play a big part, and an adequate fiber intake might be a way to prevent it, but other dietary factors are still being explored. The research team evaluated how total dietary red meat, poultry and fish intake affected 46,500 men’s risk of developing diverticulitis. The sample was taken from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Men included in this study were 40-75 years old when they first joined the HPF study between 1986 and 2012. The men were asked about their standard size portions of red meat, processed meat, poultry and fish, every four years during the 26 years the study was ongoing. In total, 764 men developed diverticulitis at some point. Men eating higher amounts of red meat also were found to
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