Surgery, Often Necessary for IBD Patients, Can Be Safe Procedure, Review Says

Surgery, Often Necessary for IBD Patients, Can Be Safe Procedure, Review Says
A study reviewed literature dealing with surgical management of small bowel, large bowel and perianal Crohn's disease (CD) to identify those cases in which surgery is the best option, and found surgery overall, and especially minimally invasive surgery, to be safe. But, they cautioned, surgical rates for this patient population remain high. The review, "Indications and surgical options for small bowel, large bowel, and perianal Crohn's disease," published in World Journal of Gastroenterology, was conducted by researchers at Concord Repatriation General Hospital and other institutions in Australia. Chronic inflammation of the colon and small intestine, generally known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is managed by various means, including medications like immunomodulators and biological agents. But a large number of patients, including those showing signs of perforation, toxic megacolon, or major gastrointestinal tract (GIT) bleeding, will eventually require surgery at least once. One-third of Crohn's patients will undergo multiple operations, the researchers reported. The team looked through available literature to identify major indications for surgery, and its timing and role in improving patient outcomes and lowering rates of repeat surgeries. Researchers searched two databases, MEDLINE and Embase, from 2010-2016, and identified 510 studies, and  an additional 189 studies using hand-searching references. The abstracts were then reviewed and analyzed. The results suggested that improvements in medications were changing the requirement for surgical interventions. As a result, surgery is generally indicated for severe c
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