Significant Improvement in IBD Medication Adherence Reported by Johns Hopkins, Curant Health

Significant Improvement in IBD Medication Adherence Reported by Johns Hopkins, Curant Health

A collaborative project between researchers at Johns Hopkins University’s Meyerhoff Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center and Curant Health has produced the first study to report long-term adherence data for Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

Adherence refers to a patient’s compliance for taking medications as prescribed by their physician.

Project ALIVE (Adherence and Long-term IBD Value-added Effectiveness) was initiated in 2014 with the goal of implementing and evaluating the effectiveness of an IBD medication therapy management (MTM) model and comparing it to the current clinical standard of care in a large university hospital setting.

The two-year partnership has resulted in preliminary findings showing that Project ALIVE’s MTM model improved adherence by more than 30 percent compared to the standard of care for IBD patients.

The results have significant clinical implication because past research shows that poor IBD adherence to medication may lead to more frequent relapses, a disabling disease course, and an increased risk for colorectal cancer.

The findings were presented via poster at the 2016 American College of Gastroenterology Annual Scientific Meeting Oct. 14-19 in Las Vegas.

The presentation includes data from Project ALIVE’s randomized control trial that enrolled 110 subjects with either ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. Most subjects were female. The average age was 38.

The subjects were randomized into one of three treatment groups:

  • Intervention: received the clinical standard of care treatment that included fulfillment of medications, plus an enhanced MTM by an innovative medication management organization.
  • Control group 1: received the clinical standard of care treatment that included fulfillment of medications by an innovative medication management organization.
  • Control group 2: received clinical standard of care treatment only. Enrollment will continue until 200 subjects are enrolled. This study will evaluate 24 months of treatment.

Subject medication adherence rates were analyzed based on data from the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) and an evaluation of prescription claims within the study’s intervention and control groups.

Curant’s Health Director of Clinical Pharmacy Vickie Andros, PharmD, said the project is “well on its way” to measuring the program value for IBD patients and caregivers.

“We anticipate that our enhanced medication therapy management and patient support services will continue to demonstrate project value through outcomes improvement and impact on cost through a reduction in hospitalizations and [emergency room] visits for this patient population,” Andros said. “Continuing to validate our work alongside Dr. Dudley-Brown, her colleagues, and most importantly improving the lives of people suffering from IBD, is central to our mission.”

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