Gene Mutations Can Stop Good Gut Bacteria from Easing Crohn’s Disease

Gene Mutations Can Stop Good Gut Bacteria from Easing Crohn’s Disease
Crohn’s disease patients with certain gene mutations may not benefit from normally helpful bacteria in their guts, new research published in the journal Science revealed. The new insights may alter how clinical trials are performed and lead to more effective probiotic treatments for patients with Crohn’s disease. Researchers have known for some time that the gut microbiome — the bacterial flora of our intestines — impacts the immune responses, and much effort has been put into exploring the effects of beneficial bacteria through added probiotics for patients with gut problems. Patients with Crohn’s disease have an altered composition of the gut microbiome, a condition called dysbiosis. Additionally, people with Crohn's have gene mutations that disrupt parts of the immune system geared to sense disease-causing gut bacteria and normally trigger the immune response against the bad bacteria. Without defense, Crohn’s patients are overly exposed to the harmful effects of bad microbes. Researchers at the California Institute of Technology examined the interactions between genes and gut immune responses in mice through the study "Gene-Microbiota Interactions Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease." "In this study we were curious to see if some of the genes that are important in sensing pathogenic bacteria may also be important in sensing beneficial bacteria to promote immune health," said the study's first author Hiutung Chu, in a
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