University of Toronto Scientist Awarded $2M to Study Environment’s Impact on IBD

University of Toronto Scientist Awarded $2M to Study Environment’s Impact on IBD
University of Toronto professor of immunology has received a $2 million grant for her research into environmental changes and autoimmune disease, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), among South Asian Canadians. "Canada has among the highest rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the world. Increasingly we are seeing families new to Canada developing IBD for the first time," said Mina Mawani, president and CEO of Crohn's and Colitis Canada. "This research will shed new light as to how our Canadian environment and diet contribute to the development of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and brings us closer to new ways to prevent and treat these diseases affecting nearly 250,000 Canadians." The grant awarded Professor Jennifer Gommerman is part of an investment of $16 million over five years into research aiming to find new treatments for various chronic diseases. It was provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), and announced by federal health minister Jane Philpott. Dr. Gommerman’s study, also supported by Crohn's and Colitis Canada, will explore how changes in an  environmental setting can impact health, a pertinent question in a time when migration affects millions of people worldwide. "Immigration often transplants individuals and families into radically different environments in terms of climate, prevailing diet, exposure to microbial pathogens, exposure to pollutants, and changes in lifestyle dictated by economic necessity; yet, we know little about the impact of global migration on health and disease" said Dr. Gommerman in a
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.