IBD Study Finds Chromoendoscopy Best at Detecting Cancerous Changes

IBD Study Finds Chromoendoscopy Best at Detecting Cancerous Changes
In a new study, researchers reported that chromoendoscopy is a more effective diagnostic and monitoring method for detection of dysplasia in long-term surveillance of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The article, titled “Chromoendoscopy is More Effective Than Standard Colonoscopy in Detecting Dysplasia During Long-term Surveillance of Patients with Colitis,” was published in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. IBD is a known risk factor for colorectal cancer, a fact that further increases the importance of effective surveillance of these patients. Previous studies have shown that chromoendoscopy, a method that uses stains to highlight changes in the digestive mucosa during endoscopy, is superior to standard surveillance techniques — such as white light colonoscopy, non-targeted biopsies, targeted sampling, and removal of lesions — in the identification of dysplasia or malignant changes that could indicate an increased risk for colorectal cancer. Despite the growing consensus favoring chromoendoscopy, the efficacy of the method in the long term has not been fully explored. To evaluate the technique's efficacy in long-term surveillance, the researchers analyzed data from 68 patients diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (55) or Crohn’s disease (13) at Mount Sinai Medical Center. The patients had long-term follow-up, from June 2006 through October 2011, in which they were examined through random biopsy, targeted white-light examination (WLE), and chromoendoscopy to compare the efficacy of the three methods. Results from the 208 examinations showed that 44 dysplastic lesions were identified in
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