Crohn’s Disease Patients May Benefit From Bowel-Sparing Surgical Option

Crohn’s Disease Patients May Benefit From Bowel-Sparing Surgical Option
A new study recently published in the journal JAMA Surgery reveals that a bowel-sparing surgical option for Crohn's disease (CD) patients, called side-to-side isoperistaltic strictureplasty (SSIS), can be beneficial -- and with acceptable recurrence rates. The study, "Long-term Results and Recurrence-Related Risk Factors for Crohn's Disease in Patients Undergoing Side-to-Side Isoperistaltic Strictureplasty," was conducted by researchers at the University of Florence, Italy. CD is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) characterized by chronic inflammation in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, with the inflammation triggered in any location of the patient's body, although most commonly in the small bowel. The condition affects all layers of the gastrointestinal wall (mucosa, sub-mucosa, muscular externa and serosa). Common symptoms include irregular and frequent bowel movements, weight loss, malaise, fatigue, and persistent diarrhea with occasional rectal bleeding. Complications specific to CD include blockage of the intestine due to inflammation and swelling that leads to abdominal cramps, vomiting, and bloating. In the SSIS surgical procedure, strictures (narrowing of the bowel's lumen), instead of being removed (called a bowel resection), are widened by making a cut lengthwise along the bowel and then suturing the ends. This surgery restores a free flow through the bowel without removing the narrowed segments, sparing the patient's bowel. Researchers believed SSIS could be useful in patients undergo
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