IBD Found to Be Varied and Complex in Genetic Study

IBD Found to Be Varied and Complex in Genetic Study
A new study consisting of a large genetic and clinical data analysis provides insight into the variations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and evidence that the classification into two disease groups — Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) — is overly simplistic. The article titled “Inherited determinants of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis phenotypes: a genetic association study” was recently published in The Lancet journal. IBD is a chronic, potentially life-threatening disease, caused by an exacerbated and inappropriate response of the immune system, leading to the inflammation and ulceration of the digestive tract. IBD is usually divided in its two main clinical manifestations: CD, which can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, and UC, where inflammation is restricted to the colon. A distinction between ileal and colonic CD has been previously suggested based on genetic differences, however the dual distinction of UC and CD is still the reigning dichotomy of IBD in clinical diagnosis, treatment decisions, and patient stratification for clinical trials. Researchers studied the genetic profiles of 29,838 patients (16,902 with CD and 12,597 with UC), from 49 centers in 16 countries in Europe, North America, Australia, and Asia — the largest study of its kind. Scientists analyzed genetic and phenotipic associations, and generated genetic risk scores where a risk could be attributed to a particular type of IBD phenotype. Results indicated that are t
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