Differences in Cell-Signaling Protein Production Levels Do Not Affect Disease Type in Quiescent Crohn’s Disease

Differences in Cell-Signaling Protein Production Levels Do Not Affect Disease Type in Quiescent Crohn’s Disease
A new study on Crohn's Disease revealed that individual differences in innate cytokine production are not important in the development of Quiescent Crohn's Disease. The study entitled “LPS-Stimulated Whole Blood Cytokine Production Is Not Related to Disease Behavior in Patients with Quiescent Crohn's Disease” was published this July in PLOS ONE. Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease with a widespread variation in the disease course ranging from mild ileal inflammation to entire gastro-intestinal tract involvement. The production of innate cytokines (proteins that cause other cells to behave in distinct ways) in Crohn’s disease patients is genetically determined and has a crucial role in the induction and maintenance of inflammation. There are currently no consistent biomarkers associated with the disease. However, profiles in cytokine production appear to be important in Crohn's Disease due to their relevant function in the etiology and development of the disease. During CD, the defective mucosal barrier of the gut lumen is largely exposed to gram-negative bacteria that have high levels of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Thus, individual differences in cytokine production may influence the severity of inflammation and predict the disease course of patients with CD. Based on these insights, prior studies have established a link among innate cytokine production in mucosal tissue and disease progression. In the present study, the research team evaluated cytokine producti
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