Study Finds Individuals With IBD Twice More Likely To Develop Generalized Anxiety Disorders

Study Finds Individuals With IBD Twice More Likely To Develop Generalized Anxiety Disorders
Results from a recent study published in the journal Inflammatory Bowel Diseases conducted by team of researchers from the University of Toronto show that individuals with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, are two times more likely to suffer from a generalized anxiety disorder during their lifetime in comparison to individuals without IBD. "Patients with IBD face substantial chronic physical problems associated with the disease," said in a recent news release lead-author Professor Esme Fuller-Thomson, the Sandra Rotman Endowed Chair at the University of Toronto's Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. "The additional burden of anxiety disorders makes life much more challenging so this 'double jeopardy' must be addressed." In the study, the researchers found that females with IBD are four times more likely to suffer from an anxiety disorder compared with men. The researchers used data from over 22,000 Canadians, retrieved from the 2012 Canadian Community Health Study: Mental Health. Results showed 269 had a diagnosis of ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. "The study draws attention to the need for routine screening and targeted interventions for anxiety disorders," said co-author and adjun
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