Non-Invasive Accupoint Stimulation May Offer New Bioelectronics Approach To Crohn’s Treatment

Non-Invasive Accupoint Stimulation May Offer New Bioelectronics Approach To Crohn’s Treatment
An oral abstract presented on Tuesday June 9 at the International Neuromodulation Society 12th World Congress, which ran from June 6 to 11 at the Fairmont Queen Elizabeth Hotel in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, announced a new collaboration between U.S. and Chinese scientists investigating non-invasive accupoint electrical stimulation in Crohn's disease. The objective of a controlled clinical trial underway at the Medical University Department of Gastroenterology at the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing is to attempt a reduction in inflammatory response underlying the chronic gastrointestinal disorder. The study led by gastroenterologist and principal investigator Hongjie Zhang, M.D. recruited 17 Crohn's disease patients and 20 matched healthy controls between June 2014 and December 2014. The subjects received transdermal accupoint electrical stimulation (TAES) for an hour twice-daily, two hours after eating meals, delivered at an accupoint on the stomach meridian below the knee -- the Zusanli (ST 36). The study was initially proposed to Dr. Zhang by Jiande Chen, Ph.D. of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore. "We have published numerous studies showing that electrical stimulation via the acupuncture points using surface electrodes can enhance vagal activity," he comments. "By enhancing vagal activity, we have shown in animals with intestinal inflammation that such electrical stimulation can suppress pro-inflammatory cytokines and thus reduce inflammation. Those data are being prepared for publication." Participants in the clinical study receive needle-less electrical stimulation through a wristwatch-sized adhesive device, powered by a wa
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