Study Finds Specific T Cells Involved in Persistent Inflammatory Response in Ulcerative Colitis

Study Finds Specific T Cells Involved in Persistent Inflammatory Response in Ulcerative Colitis
In a recent study published in the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Pathology, a team of researchers found that specific T cells may act as major effector cell subsets in persistent inflammatory responses for Ulcerative Colitis, and that infiltration into colon inflammation may be induced by the combination of two particular gastrointestinal adhesion molecules. Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic relapsing and remitting inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. The regulatory T cells in the intestinal tract known for their inability to balance the excessive inflammatory responses against intestinal flora and food antigens are considered an important immune mechanism of UC. CD4+T cells serve as a major effector cells and are frequently overexpressed in UC. CD4+CD29+T cells belong to a class of memory effector cells. CD29 is preferentially expressed on activated T cells that respond very well to recall antigens. Activation of beta (1) integrins (CD29) has been reported to mediate proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of intestinal CD4-positive lymphocytes, important factors to perpetuate inflammatory process. Evidence indicates that enhanced expression of adhesion molecules might lead to accumulation of CD4+CD29+T memory cells in inflamed tissues and that cells might act as main effector cell subsets in persistent inflammatory responses for UC, which could be migrated to i
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