Fecal Calprotectin Shown To Be Potential Biomarker for Crohn’s Disease Recurrence After Intestinal Resection

Fecal Calprotectin Shown To Be Potential Biomarker for Crohn’s Disease Recurrence After Intestinal Resection
New research revealed that fecal calprotectin levels may be a biomarker for assessing Crohn’s disease after intestinal resection. The study entitled ”Measurement of Fecal Calprotectin Improves Monitoring and Detection of Recurrence of Crohn’s Disease After Surgery” was published in Gastroenterology by Emily K. Wright from the Department of Gastroenterology, St Vincent’s Hospital and University of Melbourne in Australia, along with colleagues. Among patients with Crohn’s disease, 70% of them will need intestinal resection during their lifetime, and within this group, around 70% will require a second surgery. Early postoperative disease recurrence is normally identified by endoscopy and its severity correlates with the subsequent clinical outcome. Endoscopy has been the standard procedure for detecting and quantifying bowel inflammation, but is expensive, work intensive, difficult for the patient, and has some risk. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify alternative biomarkers that would help to follow postoperative disease recurrence. However, until now there has been no simple diagnostic test validated against endoscopy in large populations to screen postoperative disease recurrence. Calprotectin is a member of the S100 family of calcium binding proteins and is abundant in all body fluids. Its levels correlate to the grade of inflammation. Fecal calprotectin (FC) has been shown to replicate endoscopic disease activity. FC has been shown to be more sensitive than Crohn’s Disease Activ
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