Researchers Find That Chromoendoscopy for IBD Surveillance Fails to Increase Dysplasia Detection

Researchers Find That Chromoendoscopy for IBD Surveillance Fails to Increase Dysplasia Detection
Recently, researchers from the University Medical Center Utrecht in the Netherlands released results from a comparative study that looked at the capacity of tests to detect colorectal dysplasia in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).  Their research suggests that Chromoendoscopy for surveillance in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) does not increase detection of dysplasia compared with conventional white light endoscopy with random biopsy sampling. The study entitled, “Chromoendoscopy for Surveillance in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Does Not Increase Neoplasia Detection Compared with Conventional Colonoscopy With Random Biopsies: Results From a Large Retrospective Study,” was published in the latest edition of the American Journal of Gastroenterology. Background Terminology: Colorectal dysplasia: condition in which the cells within the colon have become abnormal. These abnormal cells are considered to be pre-cancerous. White light endoscopy (WLE): endoscopy (an instrument used to examine the interior of the digestive tract) procedure using light to detect abnormal cells. Chromoendoscopy: endoscopy using dyes to detect abnormal cells. Inflammatory bowel disease IBD is a debilitating disease caused by chronic inflammation throughout all or part of a patient’s digestive tract.  It includes: Ulcerative colitis (UC): causes long-lasting inflammation and sores (ulcers) in the innermost lining of the large intestine (colon) and rectum. Crohn’s disease (CD): causes inflammation of the lining of the digestive tract. In Crohn’s disease, inflammation often spreads deep into affected tissues. The inflammation can involve the large intestine, small intestine or both. Patients with IBD are at increased risk for developing colorectal can
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