Possible Association Between Long-Term Oral Contraceptive Use and Risk of Crohn’s Disease in Women

Possible Association Between Long-Term Oral Contraceptive Use and Risk of Crohn’s Disease in Women
Texas Medical School Alum and former Internal Medicine resident at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dr. Hamed Khalili, MD, MPH, is seeing renewed interest in one of his previously published scientific studies entitled, “Oral contraceptives, reproductive factors and risk of inflammatory bowel disease,” from both US and UK science media outlets. The study which was first published in the May 2012 on-line edition of Gut aimed to determine whether there was an associative risk with oral contraceptive use and the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), independent of other lifestyle factors. IBD is a debilitating disease caused by chronic inflammation throughout all or part of a patient’s digestive tract.  It includes: Ulcerative colitis (UC): causes long-lasting inflammation and sores (ulcers) in the innermost lining of the large intestine (colon) and rectum. Crohn's disease (CD): causes inflammation of the lining of the digestive tract. In Crohn's disease, inflammation often spreads deep into affected tissues. The inflammation can involve the large intestine, small intestine or both. Women are more likely to be diagnosed than men with IBD. Studies conducted in the 1990s have shown an association between oral contraceptive use and the risk CD and UC. Unfortunately, despite continued investigation, it is still unclear whether this association is independent or in relationship to lifestyle factors or reproductive status. The 2012 study made an important and significant contribution to the literature because it attempted to examine oral contraceptive use and risk of CD or UC in relation to important lifestyle and reproductive factors. To examine this association, Dr. Khalili and his collaborators looked through the medical
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.