New Study Finds Genetic Features Associated With Crohn’s Disease, Psoriasis Date Back to pre-Neanderthals

New Study Finds Genetic Features Associated With Crohn’s Disease, Psoriasis Date Back to pre-Neanderthals
Diseases related to IBD, including Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis, are increasingly prevalent in modern society. Similarly, Psoriasis, a common chronic inflammatory skin condition that involves red elevated patches and flaking silvery scales as well as causing rashes that itch and sting, continues to be widespread health issue in the world today. Scientists at the State University of New York at Buffalo are intrigued as to why a genetic susceptibility to Crohn's Disease, Psoriasis and other diseases persist for hundreds of thousands of years, afflicting both our ancient ancestors, and us, having discovered that genetic variations associated with certain modern medical disorders reach back to distant antiquity, predating the Neanderthals and Denisovans (another ancient hominid), as well as contemporary humans. The study led by SUNY Buffalo biologist Omer Gokcumen compared modern human DNA to that of Neanderthals and Denisovans, and found that genetic deletions associated with various aspects of human health, including psoriasis and Crohn’s disease, likely originated in a common ancestor of the three species. The findings of the SUNY Buffalo study were published last month in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution in a paper entitled "The Evolution and Functional Impact of Human Deletion Variants Shared with Archaic Hominin Genomes" (Mol Biol Evol (2015) doi: 10.1093/molbev/msu405 First published online: January 2, 2015), coau
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