Fecal Microbiota Transplant May Effectively Treat IBD, but More Research Needed, Review Study Says

Fecal Microbiota Transplant May Effectively Treat IBD, but More Research Needed, Review Study Says
Treating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) shows potential, but longer clinical trials and more information on the best method of delivery, the risks, and the best matched donor for each patient are needed, according to a review study. The study, “Fecal microbiota transplant — a new frontier in inflammatory bowel disease,” appeared in the Journal of Inflammatory Research. The intestinal microbiota — the community of microorganisms in the gut — is involved in several processes, including gut development, immune responses, and resistance to pathogens, as well as brain development and function. However, changes in bacterial composition and number, known as dysbiosis, are well-known in IBD patients and are considered key in gut inflammation. FMT, a procedure in which fecal or stool matter from a healthy donor is placed in a patient — often by colonoscopy or rectal enema — is intended to restore bacterial numbers. It can reduce bowel permeability by boosting the production of short-chain fatty acids and correct dysbiosis by lowering the generation of inflammatory factors, inhibiting the activity of immune T-cells, and suppressing the adhesion of leukocytes, or white blood cells, to the endothelium, which l
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