Genetic Changes Specific to IBD-associated Colorectal Cancer May Help Identify High-risk Patients

Genetic Changes Specific to IBD-associated Colorectal Cancer May Help Identify High-risk Patients
Newly discovered genetic alterations that precede the development of colorectal cancer associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may help in the development of diagnostic tools to identify patients at the highest risk of this cancer, researchers say. Findings were published in the study, “Evolutionary history of human colitis-associated colorectal cancer,” in the journal Gut. “These mutations could form the basis of a simple diagnostic test for predicting who is at high risk,” Trevor Graham, PhD, the study’s senior author and a professor at Barts Cancer Institute at Queen Mary University of London, said in a press release. “If we could do it accurately, it would allow us to target care to those who need it most, and spare low-risk individuals unnecessary worry." Patients with IBD — mainly Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis — have a more than two times greater risk of developing colorectal, or bowel, cancer. This risk is significantly increased in IBD patients with extensive disease, longer disease duration, and/or greater severity. While these patients are intensively monitored for colorectal cancer, the rate of cancer diagnosis after a negative screening test is still up to
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